Svalbard And Ponderings On Universal Basic Income

I’ve been in Longyearbyen for a few days now, and it is an interesting city from almost any standpoint (at least my staindpoints). The thing that struck me the most after taking a short stroll through the city, is that parts of the community here could be used as a “stencil” for an idealised version of how universal basic income (UBI) might work.

I’ve previously written another post about UBI, and you can find it here:

To understand why, you need to understand where Longyearbyen and Svalbard started.

In the beginning, the primary settlements in Svalbard were mining communities. Svalbard has rich coal reserves, and the first settlements were hardworking people from different countries.

Over the years though, the primary “industry” has changed from mining to research, education in an Arctic setting and tourism. There is still mining activity, but nowhere near as much any more.

Read More

Advertisements

My First Guest Post – Femme Frugality!

I am afraid I can only muster a short post today. I just arrived in Svalbard today to spend the next seven weeks attending an intensive course about organic pollutants. I have peeked at the schedule, and it will be taking no prisoners.

So instead, I will implore you to head over to my friend Femme’s excellent blog where I recently wrote my first ever guest post! Femme approached me after the quite popular Autism and Personal Finances post I wrote a few weeks back, and very kindly asked me if I wanted to write a post for her autism awareness month feature.

Initially, I didn’t quite know what to write, having written the autism post I had set out to write, but one of Femme’s suggestions about autism and disableism set me off, and off I went.

It is perhaps a little more raw and dark compared to some of the posts on this blog. I try my best to write in a lighthearted and cheerful tone, but some truths cannot be taken too lightly, or they will not come across as they should.

So please, head on over and read the post I wrote about my meeting with disableism and work. And while you’re there, please make sure you read some of her other amazing posts as well!

The Oppression Of Being Replaceable

There has been quite a few discussions in the personal finance sphere about privilege, poverty and money lately. One post about Poverty Tourism by Liz over at Chief Mom Officer in particular made me think about just how intrinsic privilege can be, and how difficult it can be to claw your way out of poverty.

It made me think about this post, which has been lying in my drafts folder for several months.

It was something that came to my mind around the time I changed from an underappreciated job to one where I was welcomed with open arms. The stark contrast from being treated like a very disposable commodity to one where my skills and education were needed was a pretty big shock to the system.

Not just that, but moving to a job where I felt safe in my ability to pay off bills and did not have to feel insecure about where the next shift was going to come from, meant that the higher paying job also made it possible for me to pick up hobbies like writing again.

Read More

Frugality Is Sustainability

There is a strange trend that I keep observing in the intersection I occupy online between frugality/personal finance and sustainable, eco-friendly lifestyles.

At least in certain corners of the internet, some people seem more concerned with showing the world that they are eco-friendly by having certain things and looking a certain way.

But considering how over-consumption and over-population are the biggest contributors to the decimation of natural resources and climate change – there is just no way you can buy yourself a sustainable lifestyle through conventional consumerism.

Read More

Frugal Pantry Staples

Do you want to fill up your pantry with cheap staples in order to stretch your grocery budget and ensure you always have something in the house to avoid those dreaded late dinner munchies?

I must admit, take-out is so atrociously expensive where we live, that it isn’t even an option. However, going to the shop more than once a week is, and that is often the one thing that can cause a significant spike in our grocery budget.

Although we don’t always manage to shop only once a week, there are several strategies that help us. Accountability and awareness of our ultimate goals are some, but a well-stocked pantry and freezer are equally important.

Thanks to both of us being quite vehement pantry stockers, we always have something to eat.

If your palate is accustomed to steak, burgers and pizza, it might take some time to get used to simpler, frugal alternatives. Cooking from scratch is, without a doubt, one of the things that really save us a boatload of money. Plus, it is better for you and creates less food waste if you’re mindful about it. What’s not to love?

Read More

March Review And Expense Report

It feels weird, but good, to realise that we are in April already. How time flies! While my Instagram feed is getting flooded in pictures of spring greenery and new life, here up north, we are still waiting for that elusive day when daytime temperatures are equal or higher to the nighttime temperatures.

Excited rumourmongers stalk the weather forecasts and hope it will be this time. Snow is melting outside, making for somewhat lethal walking conditions, but we are excited, spring is coming!

April saw us hosting my father for a few days in Easter, which meant going out to eat and sharing a few beers afterwards. We also indulged something horribly in candy over Easter, being neither healthy nor frugal. Ops.

savOn the positive side, our continual saving and investing, even in spite of being in the red and having guests over, I still managed to get my negative net worth down to the five figures in NOK! Woop woop! That zero line is inching ever closer, and I feel confident I will reach it within the year. Barring a mortgage, it’ll only be up from there!

Read More

Being Conscious With Less Frugal Friends And Family

As I am writing this, I am sitting right across our new snake plant. I had read about it over at The Green Purpose and figured I wanted some more green life to improve the mood in our living room.

Did I buy it?

In this case, I am actually a little embarrassed to admit that no, I did not buy it.

Why? Well, I don’t have any friends or family with one (that I know of), so I had no one to get an offshoot from.

How did I come across one then?

Well, I thought maybe my grandmother might have one, so I thought about it for some time, before asking her if she did.

She did not, and now I had a problem. She had heard that I wanted a snake plant. In her grandmotherly mind, that meant she had to buy me one and ship it over 570 kilometres (over 350 miles) to  our flat, because our local plant shops could not possibly have one.

I thought I managed to talk her out of it, only to greet my father, visiting for a few days over Easter, with a 3 feet tall snake plant in hand. I suppose I might have expected as much, but to my surprise, he had not paid for it either!

As it turns out, he had gone to the plant shop to ask after a snake plant. The store clerk said they were not in stock, but she had one at home not five minutes away, and he could have that one.

Que bafflement and amazement that a stranger gives my dad a large, healthy snake plant for free.

Read More

Did The Market Crash Yet?

At the time I am writing this, my meagre little investment account (started about seven months ago) has been in the red for a while, ever since the market took a bit of a dive about a month ago.

Mr. E’s account has been the same. A small, initial fall, and then a steady walk downwards.

There was one full month where my investments increased as much as my student loan interest per month. That was a good one. A net-zero, if only for a little while.

But now we watch the red, and I am happy that I not only transfer automatically, but recently also started telling the website we use (Nordic Nordnet) what % of my automatic withdrawal I want invested in which index funds.

Read More

Sidehustle Log 04: March Update And A Website

This is a continuation of my sidehustle log series. The previous instalments can be found here:

March has been an exciting month.

I launched a website, thanks to inspiration from Alan Donegan and the Popup Business School over at Choose FI. I then worked up some courage to tell my friends and family what I was doing for once, seeing an ego-stroking boost in views as a result.

It is down again now, but what can you do. At least it is out there, right? One step at a time and all that. Some of the experimental soaps are almost done curing too, so they will be added as soon as I’ve gotten around to taking some pictures in the crisp winter weather we are currently experiencing this Easter.

Work has been hectic, as I’ve mentioned in other posts, so I haven’t had the energy to work on sidehustles as much as I would have liked.

Despite that, I have to admit that I actually started a new Etsy shop! I heard so much about pritables, instant downloads and the laptop lifestyle from the FIREdrill podcast, so I just kind of gave it a go. It is quite fun, and a welcome break if I need to take my mind off writing and over to do something creative in a different way.

Read More

Our Decluttering Box And Other Tips

Decluttering and minimalism is all the rage these days. But with our three and a half bookshelf stacked high with the written word, I suppose we wouldn’t really fit that bill.

Still, we like to surround ourselves with stuff we actually value. If we replace something, the old item should leave. If we’re gifted something we don’t like, weeeeell. It used to take me over two years to work up the courage to donate it, but these days I’m more callous (and these days we don’t receive many gifts, on account of our gifting attitude).

Our cosy apartment with a view is by no means minimalist, but we try to ensure every item has a place. That way, cleaning is less of a “where does it go?” and more of a “put everything back where it belongs” quest.

Most of the time. You’ve caught on by now that we’re not perfect, right? Good.

Read More